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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
with the actual history of civil rights in america or who have read my books notice that they had not read the books, but that was great because they believe everything the "new york times" believes, but the new york times won't argue with me. at least the gals on "the view" will argue with me. the summary of the book is white guilt never produced anything good, and don't make the same mistake again, america. that's why it had to come out before the election. it's a book about racism, and to my critics chagrin, i'm against it. [laughter] liberals have been the primary practitioners of it, and i start with the golden age of racial demagoguery in the 70s and 80s when every police shooting of a black kid would be the next case, treated in the media, suddenly the clan took over the new york city police force apparently. one of my -- it's hard to describe the beginnings because there's the brawl and various race hoaxes, and much like the trayvon martin case, they disappeared once the facts came out. you never get that final article saying, attention, readers, that story we've been his hysterica
with the actual history of civil rights in america. and it was great because they believe everything the new york times believes. at least the girls on the view would argue with me. one sentence summary of my book, and don't make the same mistake america. liberals have been the primary practitioners 7. every police shooting, suddenly the klan had taken of the new york city police force. like the trade on martin case, they disappear once the facts come out. the story we were hysterical about, you would know -- the black kid was -- did ambush and killing a cop, only because the stories would disappear from the news. one of the best ones was michael stewart who came to be called an artist because he was caught spraying graffiti in the subway. a dozen cops, they got him to the hospital two weeks later and he passed out and the revived demand and he was at a coma and died of pneumonia. he died as a result of police brutality despite medical examiner's saying the opposite. the cops are put on trial for manslaughter. they are acquitted and the new york times editorial the next day was remembering michae
the party that ignores some of these basic issues, education reform is really a major civil rights issue right now. 80% of the students in los angeles public schools are hispanic, so when that system sales, los angeles fails, california fails, but latinos feel this as well. tavis: how important is it to have voices in mainstream media that get a chance to express this view? >> one would be nice. i am struggling. when you look at the sunday morning shows, they are fairly monolithic, and once in awhile you will have someone, but i think that is the issue. we have not had because the moment in the hispanic community. we are still seeing it out of the mainstream to actually speak english. people are amazed that i speak english. it is quite a challenge to have a diverse latino zins in way. if no one tunes in to watch those shows, that will eventually change it. >> i think we will be hearing your voice. up next, the grammy nominated jazz artist robert glasper. stay with us. robert glasper is a grammy nominated judge pianist. -- jazz pianist. ♪ tavis: i have always loved that your group is ca
of them before i left. will i realize people who familiar with the actual history of civil rights in america who read my book notice that they haven't read the book but that was great because they believe everything "the new york times" believes that "the new york times" doesn't argue with me. at least the gals on the few would argue with me. the one sentence summary of my book is, white skills have never produced anything good and don't make the same mistake again america. that is why it hasn't come out before the election. hits a book about racism and to my critics chagrin i am against it. [laughter] liberals have been the primary practitioners of it and i start with the golden age of racial demagoguery in the 70's and 80s when every police shooting of a black kid would be the next mattel case and that is how what was treated in the media. suddenly the klan has taken over new york city police force. there are vignettes of various race hoaxes and much like the trayvon martin case, they all just disappear once the facts came out. you would never guess that this final article. atte
mean, a real movement like the labor movement or the anti-war movement on the civil right movement. a bunch of college kids waiving signs. we have to woo have a real movement that connects with people in their every day lives. that's the only way our side wins. thank you very much. >> wait. wait! we have time for one more question. >> you mentioned the power of money it is in churches very suspicious of the fundamentalist schurnlgs they say god wants you to be rich. that is for a part of the problem is. -- i have a needle. come on. >> guys? as a political junkie, i love reading the book. go out there and go to the book signing. buy it. thank you very much. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >>> in a couple of minutes we'll be back with more live coverage of the texas book festival. a panel on education reform is next. here's a look at upcoming book fairs and festivals. this weekend booktv is live from a texas book festival. it includes present tastes by many people. visit booktv.org for complete schedule of the events. >>> national press club book fair a
series. he had come out on a series looking on civil-rights issues in america. that was a fundamental place for me to learn. i also worked on a documentary series for a long time. i learned by working in production and by immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to the best practices, the thing that happens in an institution where you are not just struggling to make the thing. you are talking about it and you also have community and resources. if you can afford it, that is a powerful route. i happened to learn the hardest way possible, which is by working in production and not doing anything else. >> is that an issue here, the kind of methods, the institutions and the pattern and career that allows people to be trained to do watch-dog type stuff, whether they are journalists or do similar things, are those trying up? -- drying up? >> documentary films are interesting. in some ways, that still exists. in journalism, the apprentice ship model the newspaper used to offer is definitely going away. you have a staff of 10 and you might be able to mentor some nu
unman e drones however some civil rights have privacy issueshey're hoping this small aircraft could help with other law-enforcement agencies. >> for a search and rescue, squad, fire arms, rural areas. not easily accessible by a patrol car those types of situations. it could be a tremendous search help. >> the advantage is attractive. about a low amount of fuel on a helicopter. $1500 per helicopter. the shares to it is attractive. >> to lower the amount of fuel in a helicopter which is $1,500 per hour for a helicopter however, these are only $2,200 per month to park and has avoided the unmanned aircraft and privacy concerns that arise. >> when they think of a drone... drones that fly over pakistan. or a-grown but this is a quad helicopter. the about privacy concerns are always a concern for us. we have that robots and that and on the bomb squad and in the worst bomb squads for remote control. we do not roll closed down the road this is mission however specific. if we have a person that is fired off a gun and we can deploy this and nothing that the public would have a problem with that. o
with civil rights. grant was the last of the lincoln republicans. one point i make is grant was the last president, the only president between abraham lincoln and lyndon johnson who took civil-rights for african-americans seriously. after grant left office the former slaves were left to the tender mercies of the majority of the south and quickly they were shoved to the side. >> don't ask the question if you don't want bill to answer it thoroughly. >> i do accept yes and no, multiple choice questions. >> we only have three minutes and there's a serious deadline so a brief question. >> you said you want to write history or biography. when i read your benjamin franklin biography you sound like a particle american, the first to the modern in some sense. very different people speaking. , who is the first american in the sense that he or she has attitudes like we do and writing biographies and things like that between 1620, and 1770. >> i am not sure i understand the question. who is the first american? >> who would you think after early colonization would have american attitudes that we recog
years. a pbs series. he had come out on a series looking on civil-rights issues in america. that was a fundamental place for me to learn. i also worked on a documentary series for a long time. i learned by working in production and by immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to the best practices, the thing that happens in an institution where you are not just struggling to make the thing. you are talking about it and you also have community and resources. if you can afford it, that is a powerful route. i happened to learn the hardest way possible, which is by working in production and not doing anything else. >> is that an issue here, the kind of methods, the institutions and the pattern and career that allows people to be trained to do watch-dog type stuff, whether they are journalists or do similar things, are those drying up? >> documentary films are interesting. in some ways, that still exists. in journalism, the apprenticeship model the newspaper used to offer is definitely going away. you have a staff of 10 and you might be able to mento
these guys. at the end of the day, the overwhelming majority of guys in civil service are doing just that. obviously, it's politically astute for christie to be doing it, but he's doing it for a reason -- you genuinely believe this is a guy who wants to do right by his people. barack obama, you're seeing a human being there. and the camera doesn't lie. obviously, will this weigh an election -- obviously, it leans clearly for obama, but what i love about this is what you see with these guys is the same what you see with the guys in the streets of hoboken that were affected. i believe people are overwhelmingly are tremendously decent including politicians, and you're seeing that. >> is it too cynical to read all this in? let's be clear. analysis is happening within the washington political bubble. but i think if you're watching on television, you're seeing chris christie doing what he has to do for his state and the president doing what a president does, arriving in a disaster zone offering consolation but also his federal help. >> yeah. that's all true. but it does have a political impact.
to the civil rights act. >> this conversation is taking a nasty turn since i found out i got my tac -- facts wrong. [laughter] >> you know, you got so many other facts right in your book, i don't think you need to worry. i would like you each to talk a little bit, starting with you, marc, about the different facets and aspects of the personalities to which you were privy, in particular in your case lbj and some of the dynamics and contradictions in lbj is personality as reflected by the many voices that you have included in this book. >> well, i'm looking at in the audience. many technology to people, one of whom is harry middleton. terry was the first director of the lbj library, my predecessor, my dear friend, and so much of the scholarship about ladybird johnson comes from the work that harry did in the lbj library. the other one sitting next to him is surely a chance to work for mrs. johnson for many years into recently prevailed with the united states post office in getting a postage stamp in honors of ladybird johnson. [applause] a friend of mine and harry's ensure lease was a speechwr
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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